Our Sacred Garden

A Healthy Garden is a Healthy Life

1 oz Sage Leaf (Salvia officinalis) Organic & Kosher USA

$1.95
DISCOUNTS
S l1600
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Estimated to arrive by Fri, Mar 2nd

This estimate is based on:

  • The seller's handling time
  • USPS First Class Mail (2 to 3 business days) transit time to US

The item could arrive as early as Thu, Mar 1st.
Actual delivery times may vary.

$3.00 via USPS First Class Mail (2 to 3 business days) to United States
Quantity Available
10 in stock
Return policy
Full refund available within 30 days

Item details

Condition
New
UPC
Does not apply
Brand
Our Sacred Garden
Active Ingredients
Sage Leaf

About this item

 

Also known as

Salvia officinalis, Common Sage, Garden Sage, Dalmatian Sage, and Purple Sage

Introduction

The common garden sage has been known and used for culinary and medicinal purposes for centuries. The low-growing evergreen shrub is popular in nearly every European cuisine and is used variously to flavor meats, poultry, soups, puddings, cheeses and vegetables. Its unmistakable peppery flavor makes it popular for use in poultry and pork stuffing, and to flavor and preserve sausage meats. “Why should a man die when sage grows in his garden?” Martin Luther is said to have asked in the middle ages, and his statement is reflected in the herb’s Latin name * salvia, derived from the Latin word to heal. For cooking, aromatherapy or healing, sage has proved itself throughout the ages, and continues to prove itself even now.

Constituents

Thujone (35 to 60%), 1,8-cineol (15%), camphor (18%), borneol (16%), bornyl esters, a-pinene and salvene.

Parts Used

Leaves and stems

Typical Preparations

Dried or fresh leaves in food, and as a tea. Sometimes found in washes and cosmetics.

Summary

One of the more popular herbs in the Middle Ages through 18th century, sage has drifted into lesser use as more delicate flavors grew more popular. The evergreen herb is enjoying a resurgence of late, in part based on its many uses and benefits. Sage can be used to flavor and preserve nearly any meat or cheese, and is often used in soups and salads as well.

Precautions

Thujone, a volatile oil in common sage, is hallucinogenic, addictive and toxic when taken in extreme excess. The plant and tea made from it should be avoided by pregnant women. Its long term use is not recommended.

For educational purposes only This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.