Our Sacred Garden

A Healthy Garden is a Healthy Life

4oz Wormwood (Artemisia absinthium) Organic & Kosher USA

$6.99
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S l1600
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Estimated to arrive by Fri, Mar 2nd

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Item details

Condition
New
UPC
Does not apply
Brand
Our Sacred Garden
Active Ingredients
Wormwood

About this item

 

Also known as

Artemisia absinthus, Absinthe, Absinthe Wormwood, and Old Woman’s Weed.

Introduction

As bitter as wormwood, goes an ancient proverb, and wormwood is indeed one of the most bitter of all plants. Named after the Greek goddess Artemis, the plant is said to have been delivered to Chiron, the father of medicine, by the goddess herself. Wormwood is often used as a companion plant, as it has strong pest repellant properties, and deters the growth of weeds. Its best known use is in the making of absinthe, a liquor distilled from wormwood which is said to have hallucinogenic effects. Such famous men as Hemingway and Van Gogh attributed part of their creativity to absinth induced visions. The absinthe recommended by the ancient physicians from the Egyptian through the Greeks was likely a very different recipe than that with which we are familiar today. It is most likely that it was simply wormwood soaked in wine or spirits, imparting the medicinal value of the plant to the alcohol. Among its traditional uses, Pliny noted that victorious champions at the races often drank a cup of wine in which wormwood had been soaked to remind them that victory was bitter as well as sweet.

Constituents

Thujone (absinthol or tenacetone), thujyl alcohol, acids, absinthin, tannins, resin, potash, starch

Parts Used

The whole herb (leaf, stem and flowering parts)

Typical Preparations

Soaked in wine or other spirits, as a tea, in some dream and sleep pillows, as a liquid herbal extract and sometimes found in capsules.

Summary

Wormwood’s rather unsavory reputation and the banning of absinthe in the United States has added to the glamour and mystery surrounding it. The active constituent thujone, most often absinthol, can be toxic in high doses. Wormwood has a long association with both bitterness and liquor, being an ingredient in Pernod, vermouth, absinthe and other alcoholic spirits.

Precautions

Wormwood contains constituents that may be toxic if ingested in large amounts and for extended periods of time. Not to be used while pregnant.

For educational purposes only This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.

This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.